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Eggs are muscle building

Eggs 101: Surprising Facts About Eggs

The Most Important Meal of the Day

Egg Industry Fact Sheet (AEB)

Eggs 101: Easy tips and recipes

Eggs and nutrition

9 eggy dinners

Lickin' the bowl

Recipe: All-day breakfast salad

Is He the Egg Man?

Eggs Receive Great for You Seal from Walmart

Egg proteins can help consumers stay awake and alert

Groups want national hens housing law

Study: Free-range or cage-produced eggs have no nutritional difference

The quintessential hard-cooked egg

Eggs: A true superfood

Eat seafood twice a week to stay healthy

The world's best breakfast food

Dr. Oz: Four hours to your perfect body, part 2

Cage-free eggs ‘unsustainable’

Protein Cost Comparison - April 2011

Egg News from AEB - April 2011

The eggs are fine! - Interview (video) with Sharman Hickman

Ten healthy snacks to eat at your desk

Nutrient-dense foods to the rescue in diabetes epidemic

New U.S. diet guidelines

Is your mood tied to your diet?

Egg News from AEB

Break out of your breakfast rut

Kashi Cereal vs The Incredible, Edible Egg: REALLY...

Vast Majority of Global Egg Production in Cage Housing

Egg handling 101: Everything you need to know about egg safety

Breakfast is anything but child’s play

Sack-packing students are well-schooled in lunch

Embrace the Egg, Not the Recall

As Egg Fears Mount, Farmers Launch Reassurance Campaign

Hickman Family Farms See Increase in Business

Cook your eggs and you don't have to worry

Eat Good. Do Good Every Day. AEB - July 2010

Healthy breakfast frittata

Choline: How much do we need and why is it important?

How to make a Mexican omelet

CHOLINE: The “New” Essential Nutrient

Research Vindicates Eggs

Eggs & Heart Health

Get Cracking with Eggs

Organic Eggs: More Expensive, but No Healthier

Time Magazine Isn't Chicken about Debunking Organic Eggs

Fun Food Holidays™: May is National Egg Month

True or false: Eggs raise your cholesterol...

Egg & cheese waffle sandwich

Eggs for Fibromyalgia & Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Feeding America:
America's egg farmers saluted our troops with a hot breakfast.

Sweet Spot: How Sugary-Cereal Makers Target Kids

Cooking for one: Eggs for dinner

Changing the way I think about eggs:

The incredible, edible egg and a GIVEAWAY

There's a place in everyone's diet for eggs

A healthy breakfast can fuel your day

The incredible, edible donation

The awesome egg – perfect food in a perfect package

Ms. Cheap: Frugal food doesn't necessarily mean junk food

Be a Good Egg... and help fight hunger

Healthy family meals

Calling all Incredible people!

A healthy budget breakfast

Importance of eggs in fetal brain development

Egg-potato tortilla center of cheap, tasty meal

Breakfast crucial; protein, fruit best

Beyond scrambled eggs: Hatching a new appreciation

Egg-cellent information

Leaving the roost

Get the perfect body by eating the perfect food: Eggs

Food donations made

Eat Right: Should you eat whole eggs?

Make this your happiest, healthiest winter ever

Keep track of your food

50 ways to cut 500 calories a day

5 healthy snacks that will fill you up

Senior cares: Foods seniors shouldn't go without

The healthy $1 menu: Black bean and egg burritos

Environmentally friendly

The perfect poached egg: How to poach an egg

Olive Oil Fried Egg

Promoting satiety

Get an egg-on-top dish, help the food bank

Recipes for before, after that big meal

HUNGER

Animal Fats not linked to increased breast cancer

Don't chuck the yolks!

Tips for entertaining on a budget

Is your food high-value?

Six foods that keep you full and satisfied

An egg-cellent recipe for babies who enjoy lumps and bumps!

There's plenty of savings packed in each egg

Five power foods that make your mind younger

Stretch your food dollar: Tips for sensible shopping

For healthy, tasty eggs, don't use just the whites

Eggs: Incredible and edible

Top 7 foods under $1

Gear up scores!

Breakfast choices impact hunger and calorie consumption throughout the day

Eggs. Yep, they're incredible and edible

Nutritious foods for healthy cheapskates

Eggs for breakfast for easier weight loss

Cooking Light...Eggs exactly right

Experts are thinking about what you eat...Maybe you should join them.

Increase your willpower

The egg - it is pretty incredible. And definitely edible

7 egg facts

Egg-xellent weight watchers

Eggs offer plenty of benefits for your health

It's not as bad as you think

Howard Helmer Segment

Protein-rich eggs are inexpensive, incredibly versatile

Six ways to make the basic deviled egg a standout on your table

Why you should eat your Easter eggs

Put those Easter eggs to good use - in your mouth

Savings eggs-travaganza

Protein at eggs-actly the right price

Cheap tricks: The incredible egg

Get more eggs in your diet

For healthy, tasty eggs, don't use just the whites

How to Hard-Cook Eggs

Disney hatches an egg-cellent idea for kids

Eggs any way can make a feast

Are eggs healthy for babies?

Is healthy eating expensive? Try these 20 foods at $1 each

Little changes add up to longer life

Easter Egg Safety Tips

Eggs Reduce Blood Pressure??

New Research: Eggs Contribute to Power, Strength and Energy

STUDY: Hen Health Better

AFBF has launched a new consumer Web site

Eggs Contribute Insignificant Risk to Heart Disease

Breakthrough foods with a hidden health bonus

Anything With an Egg on Top

Scrambled Eggs Never Sounded So Good

Eggs may prevent breast cancer

4 easy ways to live healthy in December

Eating your way to good health

Eat more healthfully while stretching food budget

Eating Healthy On A Budget

Can Less Money Equal Better Eating?

Deviled eggs are always a favorite

High protein diet helps keep weight off

Quick family meals on a budget

Calories in eggs

An egg-selent idea for slowing down Alzheimer's

Fast-food fixes

Egg-cellent news

"Cracking open" heart health myths

Eggs erase negativity!

Fill your grocery cart without busting your budget

Natural Medicine: Curb those carb cravings.

Partnership Helps Feed the Hungry.

Egg Industry Battles Animal Extremists.

How to Blow the Shell Off a Hard Boiled Egg
see demonstration video

The sunny side of eggs.

Whole Living - Tip.

Alzheimer's - Prevent it now!

Best Ten Nutrition Myths From Dieticians.

Study: Supplement For Supple Skin.

The Incredible Edible Egg.

Dilute your food budget without sacrificing flavor.

The chicken or the egg?

Eating locally on travel.

Top 5 white foods to eat.

Study finds spinach, eggs ward off cause of blindness.

Eat right during pregnancy for a better baby.

Eggs are healthy and diet soda is not.

Healthy Eggs: Are Eggs Healthy?

Healthy Breakfast Ideas for Kids

An Egg a Day could Keep Blindness Away - Australia

Cereal? Not today: Farm-fresh breakfasts give most important meal of the day a fresh angle

Not Exactly Kissing Cousins: T. Rex Related to Chickens

Best Breakfast Advice from Jonny Bowden

Do Boxers Drink Raw Eggs?

Eggs versus Oatmeal

Omelets: Crack, scramble and roll

31 days to better health

Eggs Against MS

Fitfood: Heading off the Hungries

Eggs Help Prevent Lean Muscle Loss

Eggstraordinary Comeback for a Healthy Food

Top Ten Grocery Shopping Tips For a Healthy New Year 2007

Eating Eggs May Cut Risk of Disease, OSU Reports



Eggs are muscle building

Men's Fitness Magazine - October 2013

Eggs have been vilified for years as the poster child for artery clogging foods; but further research into the role of dietary cholesterol and heart disease shows that for most people the two are not linked. Eggs have since returned to the spotlight as a health food; but they are also a serious muscle building food. The cholesterol found in the yolk of eggs serves at the scaffolding for steroid hormones and the ½ a gram of leucine per egg is like throwing gasoline on your muscle building fire.

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Eggs 101: Surprising Facts About Eggs

BetterEats.com

From breakfast to dessert, and all the meals in between, the everyday egg is a key player in the kitchen. Sure, there are ways to get around cooking with eggs, but generally speaking, these little babies are a part of daily life. Common as they are, though, how much do you really know about eggs? Here are a few facts that just might surprise you.

Egg Nutrition at a Glance

  • A large egg weighs in at about 70 calories a pop
  • Eggs are super rich in protein
  • They are one of the only foods that naturally contain vitamin D
  • They are a good source of vitamins B12, A, and E as well.

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The Most Important Meal of the Day

Online Colleges - by Staff Writers

The collegiate life is a jam-packed one—from late night studying to last minute cramming to necessary coffee runs. With the hectic schedule of student life, it can be all too easy to forget to eat breakfast. Like most people, chances are you’ve heard time and time again that “breakfast is the most important meal of the day,” and, like most people, you’re probably even willing to concede that that’s true. However, while many people acknowledge the importance of a good breakfast, very few actually partake in the first meal of the day. But the fact of the matter is that, no matter how many times you’ve heard it, “breakfast is the most important meal of the day” isn’t just a saying: It’s a scientific fact. Research shows that breakfast affects everything, from your ability to perform at school to your ability to fit into your tightest jeans.

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Egg Industry Fact Sheet (AEB)

American Egg Board - Updated periodically

Per capita consumption is a measure of total egg production divided by the total population.

  • The five largest egg producing states represent approximately 50 percent of all U.S. layers.
  • U.S. egg production during April 2012 was 6.54 billion table eggs, which is down slightly from April's 6.56 billion table eggs.
  • Presently, there are approximately 61 egg producing companies with 1 million-plus layers and 16 companies with greater than 5 million layers.**
  • To date, there are approximately 179 egg producing companies with flocks of 75,000 hens or more. These companies represent about 98 percent of all the layers in the United States.** In 1987, there were around 2,500 operations.** (Number of operations in 1987 include some contract farms and divisions.)

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Eggs 101: Easy tips and recipes

Delish.com

Whether eaten for breakfast or dinner, at home or out, eggs are a powerhouse of nutrients and protein, as well as one of the most versatile ingredients in your fridge.

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Eggs and nutrition

The Baltimore Sun

Are eggs really incredible? Yes! Eggs are affordable, a great source of lean protein, full of vitamins and minerals and low in calories, weighing in at about 70 calories each.

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Lickin' the bowl: Incredible edible egg is the center of a wide variety of recipes

Huffington Post - May 2, 2012

Eggs are healthy, cheap, and quick-cooking. They can be prepared in any number of ways: poached, scrambled, fried, frittata-ed, or any combination of the above. They can serve as a vehicle for any cuisine choice, any vegetable or meat, any whim or desire you, or your hungry companions, may have. Eggy breakfasts, step aside: eggy dinners are just what we need.

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Lickin' the bowl: Incredible edible egg is the center of a wide variety of recipes

MyPlainview.com (TX) - May 2, 2012

If you have an egg in your refrigerator, you have a meal. Scrambled, fried, baked or combined in a quiche or something as simple as an egg sandwich, eggs are the fall-back food at my house. Boil a batch of eggs and keep them in the refrigerator as a handy snack or ready to make into egg salad or everyone's favorites, deviled eggs.

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Recipe: All-day breakfast salad

USA Weekend - May 3, 2012

Besides being delicious, it's healthy and low in calories, with spinach providing its dark-green-leafy concentration of nutrients, egg bringing satisfying protein and loads of essential vitamins and minerals, and Canadian bacon supplying that sumptuous smoky pork flavor in a much leaner way than regular bacon, since it is made from the low-fat, protein-rich loin cut.

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Is He the Egg Man?

By Nikki Buchanan
Photographs by David Zickl

Being compared to the Beatles - or even a line from a Beatles song — is quite a parallel, but Dave Jordan, a.k.a.“Dave the Egg Man,” is as big in his world as John, Paul, George and Ringo were in theirs. Among the many artisans in the Buy Local Movement, Dave is a rock star. Just ask the best chefs in Arizona, or the farmers’ market regulars who happily shell out five bucks for a dozen of Dave’s antibiotic and hormone-free eggs. Goo goo g’joob.

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Eggs Receive Great for You Seal from Walmart

Most affordable source of high-quality protein and 14 percent less cholesterol

Egg Nutrition News Bureau - 312-233-1211 - info@eggnutrition.org - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PARK RIDGE, Ill. (February 7, 2012) – Today Walmart launched the new Great for You nutrition campaign to help shoppers identify healthier choices. Already touted by health experts as a nutrient power house, eggs received the Great for You seal recognizing their nutrient profile, high protein content and affordability.

"Few foods are as simple, inexpensive and versatile as eggs," says Araceli Vazquez, registered dietitian and advisor to the Egg Nutrition Center. "They can be paired with any vegetable to make a nutritious, affordable meal in minutes and should be on everyone’s grocery list."

Healthy Shopping Tools

In-store initiatives like the new Great for You program, are designed to make filling the shopping cart with nutrient-dense items, like eggs, easier than ever. The Great for You seal evaluates products and labels items that contribute valuable nutrients and contain limited amounts of saturated fat, sodium and added sugars. As the Great for You program launches in Walmart stores, families will be able to quickly distinguish better-for-you choices in each aisle.

Big Nutrition, Little Price

At an average of just 15 cents apiece, eggs are the most affordable source of high-quality protein and deliver a powerful nutrient bang for the buck, including vitamin D, choline, riboflavin, selenium and phosphorous.1 In fact, the American Heart Association includes eggs in its list of healthy foods under $1.2 A recent analysis from the United States Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service showed that eggs now have 14 percent less cholesterol (down from 215 mg to 185 mg) than previously thought and 64 percent more vitamin D.3 Additionally, they are simple and quick to prepare for a nutritious meal when time is tight.

Vazquez has some additional tips for budget-savvy shopping that keeps health in mind:

  • Take a lap – Many of the most nutrient-rich foods can be found around the outside of the grocery story, including produce, low-fat dairy, eggs and lean meats. Choosing these foods in their natural state and doing the chopping, seasoning and cooking yourself can save cash and give you more control over added fat, sodium and sugar.

  • Plan your plate – Planning the week’s meals and making a list of needed items helps avoid buying extras that could go to waste (or waistline!) or forgetting essential ingredients for a nutritious meal.

  • Don’t shop hungry – Cruising through the aisles with a grumbling stomach encourages impulse buys that add less healthy choices to your cart and blow the budget. Grab a snack like hard-boiled eggs, which can be made ahead of time and eaten before shopping to keep hunger pangs at bay.

  • Aim for a colorful cart – The MyPlate program recommends half the plate be filled with fruits and vegetables, so there should be a decent array of color in your shopping cart each week. If the palette of your cart is too beige, course correct to the produce department.

For affordable recipe ideas or more healthy eating tips, visit www.IncredibleEgg.org or www.EggNutritionCenter.org. The Egg Nutrition Center is a National Strategic Partner of the USDA’s MyPlate program, which helps Americans follow the Dietary Guidelines by providing resources and tips. For more information visit www.ChooseMyPlate.gov.

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Press Release (in PDF format)

References:
1 United States Department of Agriculture. Economic Research Service. Retail data for beef, pork, poultry cuts, eggs, and dairy products (January 19, 2012). Retrieved on January 19, 2012 from http://www.ers.usda.gov/Data/MeatPriceSpreads/.
2 American Heart Association. Healthy Foods for Under $1. Available at: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/HealthierKids/HowtoMakeaHealthyHome/Healthy-Foods-Under-1_UCM_303809_Article.jsp#.TwW_1jUS0uc. Accessed February 3, 2012.
3 US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, 2011. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 23. Online. Available at: Nutrient Data Laboratory Home Page, http://www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=12-35-45-00. Accessed October 24, 2011.

About the American Egg Board (AEB)
AEB is the U.S. egg producer’s link to the consumer in communicating the value of The incredible edible egg™ and is funded from a national legislative checkoff on all egg production from companies with greater than 75,000 layers, in the continental United States. The board consists of 18 members and 18 alternates from all regions of the country who are appointed by the Secretary of Agriculture. The AEB staff carries out the programs under the board direction. AEB is located in Park Ridge, Ill. Visit www.IncredibleEgg.org for more information.

About the Egg Nutrition Center (ENC) The Egg Nutrition Center (ENC) is the health education and research center of the American Egg Board. Established in 1979, ENC provides science-based information to health promotion agencies, physicians, dietitians, nutritional scientists, media and consumers on issues related to egg nutrition and the role of eggs in the American diet. ENC is located in Park Ridge, IL. Visit www.eggnutritioncenter.org or www.nutritionunscrambled.com for more information.


Egg proteins can help consumers stay awake and alert

Neuron

Egg proteins can help consumers stay awake and alert during the working day, says a study from Cambridge University in the UK published in the journal Neuron. The study suggests that a cellular mechanism may allow brain cells to translate different diets into different patterns of activity.

The research focused on specialized brain cells called orexin-hypocretin neurons. Wakefulness and energy rely on signals transmitted by these cells. Reduced orexin-hypocretin activity results in narcolepsy – a disorder marked by the sudden onset of sleep. The Cambridge team found that protein components of the type found in eggs whites stimulated the neurons much more than other nutrients. The amino acids appeared to stop glucose from blocking the cells.

"We found that activity in the orexin/hypocretin system is regulated by macronutrient balance rather than simply by the caloric content of the diet, suggesting that the brain contains not only energy-sensing cells but also cells that can measure dietary balance," concluded senior study author Dr. Denis Burdakov.

"Our data support the idea that the orexin/hypocretin neurons are under a 'push-pull' control by sugars and proteins. Interestingly, although behavior effects are beyond the scope of our study, this cellular model is consistent with reports that when compared with sugar-rich meals, protein-rich meals are more effective at promoting wakefulness and arousal."

"This study provides yet more proof that eggs are a superfood," said Dr. Carrie Ruxton, a British Egg Information Service nutritionist. "As well as being rich in vitamins, minerals and protein, eggs make us feel fuller for longer after meals, thus helping with weight control."

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Groups want national hens housing law

AWMA - August 17

Enriched cages similar to those shown would gradually become required for egg-laying hens if Congress were to pass legislation meeting requirements proposed by the Humane Society of the United States and the United Egg Producers.

A trade association for egg producers and an animal welfare advocacy organization will lobby for introduction of a federal law that would require more room for most egg-laying hens and cage enrichment for those birds.

In the agreement, the United Egg Producers and the Humane Society of the United States will also push for provisions that would require that euthanasia of egg-laying hens follow AVMA guidelines, require housing-related labels on egg cartons, set limits on ammonia concentrations in henhouses, and prohibit feed or water withdrawal to extend laying. The standards would apply to about 280 million hens.

The organizations jointly announced their agreement July 7, before any legislation was drafted or any members of Congress had agreed to sponsor such a bill. But the joint statement indicates the organizations agree that the legislation should include a requirement that producers give each egg-laying hen at least 124 square inches of floor space and that the provisions be phased in within 18 years of the legislation's passage. The United Egg Producers' Certified program currently calls for 67 to 86 square inches of useable space per hen in cage-based production, and those standards have been adopted by most of the industry…

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Study: Free-range or cage-produced eggs have no nutritional difference

World Poultry - August 17

Eggs produced by free-rage hens are often perceived by the public to be nutritionally superior to eggs obtained from layers kept in traditional battery cages. However, a recent scientific study has called this popular perception into question by finding essentially no differences in the nutritional quality of eggs obtained produced by hens from both management systems, said the Poultry Science Association (PSA).

The findings also showed that cholesterol levels in all eggs were lower than US Department of Agriculture guidelines, prompting the USDA to review and revise downward its estimates fro average cholesterol levels in eggs.

The study, “Comparisons Fatty Acid, Cholesterol, and Vitamin A and E Composition in Eggs from Hens Housed in Conventional Cage and Range Production Facilities, “ appeared in the July issue of Poultry Science, a journal published by PSA. Its author, Dr. Kenneth E. Anderson, a Professor in Department of Poultry Science at North Carolina State University, collected data for the study in 2008 and 2009. The study was conducted concurrently with the North Carolina Layer Performance and Management Test (NCLP&MT), which evaluates the major commercial layer lines in the United States…

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The quintessential hard-cooked egg

San Francisco Chronicle - July 11, 2011

Eggs that are a week old are best to hard-cook. If you are using very fresh eggs, add 2 teaspoons of salt or more to the water. The salt reacts through the porous shell, helping to separate the thin membrane from the white.

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Eggs: A true superfood

FOX News - July 11, 2011 - By Tanya Zuckerbrot

I don't know about you, but I always have eggs in the house. I eat them hard-boiled (alone for a snack or chopped up in a salad for lunch), scrambled for breakfast, or in a frittata with veggies for dinner. Eggs are easy to make, affordable, and very nutritious, but in the past few years, they've gotten an undeserved bad rap due to their high cholesterol and saturated fat content.

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Eat seafood twice a week to stay healthy

Marion Star - July 10, 2011

Another good protein choice: an egg. One egg a day, on average, doesn't increase the risk of heart disease. Only the yolk contains cholesterol, so add as much egg white as you like.

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The world's best breakfast food

Men's Health - July 10, 2011 - By Markham Heid

We've known for a while that eggs are packed with an almost bewildering lineup of healthy minerals and nutrients-including vitamin D, choline, and carotenoids (more antioxidants!), to name a few. They're also chock-full of hunger-quelling protein (6 grams per large egg), which is why they're such a perfect breakfast food.

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Dr. Oz: Four hours to your perfect body, part 2

July 12, 2011

Eggs don't change your cholesterol numbers unless you have a genetic problem, it really is a safe source of protein. [Video; 3:59]

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Professors say cage-free eggs ‘unsustainable’

The Daily Athenaeum on March 29 - By Lydia Nuzum

Joe Moritz, associate professor and state extension poultry specialist for WVU Extension Services, said the Davis College was not consulted on the switch to the free-range egg system. In March, Dining Services made a campus-wide switch to the use of cage-free eggs in all of the dining halls and the Mountainlair.

"I have concerns with describing cage-free production as a more sustainable practice that provides improved welfare," Moritz said.

Based on scientific data, newer cage systems of egg production reduce environmental and carbon footprints, use less land, feed and energy, and reduce morbidity and mortality from disease and hen cannibalism, according to the issued counterargument.

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Protein Cost Comparison - April 2011 (USDA)

United States Department of Agriculture. Economic Research Service.

The report (PDF format 488Kb)

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Egg News from AEB - April 2011

Incredible News from AEB - April 2011

4.4 billion egg servings of growth - The great news is egg servings, which include egg breakfast sandwiches and breakfast burrito/wraps, at Quick-Service Restaurants (QSRs) for the morning meal havecontinued to increase steadily since 2001.

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The eggs are fine!

Sharman Hickman was interviewed recently by KPHO Channel 5 about the safety of the food supply in the United States following concerns about radiation coming from Japan.

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Ten healthy snacks to eat at your desk

Register Guard (OR) - January 30, 2011 - By Ellen Syversen

Ideally office snacks should provide 200 calories or less. But Bowden also recommends even lower-cal choices, like a single hard-boiled egg. One egg has around 70 calories and is packed with five or six grams of protein.

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Nutrient-dense foods to the rescue in diabetes epidemic

Register Guard (OR) - January 30, 2011 - By Ellen Syversen

In addition, some key tips for maintaining blood sugar balance throughout the day, for children and adults alike, include eating a breakfast of healthy fats and good quality protein (such as an egg and vegetable scramble); eating carbohydrates in combination with protein and healthy fats; eating a whole foods diet 80 percent of the time; getting more of your carbohydrates from vegetables; switching from juice to herbal teas; and having fruit for dessert.

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New U.S. diet guidelines urge less salt, more dairy

CUSA Today - January 30, 2011 - By Nanci Hellmich

"The guidelines are achievable goals," says Elizabeth Ward, a registered dietitian in Boston who is writing a book on them for the American Dietetic Association. Make smart substitutions each day.

In practical terms, she says, that means eating an egg, whole-grain toast and fruit for breakfast instead of sugary cereal, toaster treats or a plain bagel with cream cheese.

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Is your mood tied to your diet?

Susan B. Dopart M.S., R.D. - January 28, 2011

Eat a higher protein breakfast. If you are consuming the normal cereal or toast breakfast this is a set-up for having symptoms. A typical bowl of cereal is like eating 3-5 slices worth of bread which will trigger the symptoms within a few hours. Consider consuming high quality protein such as eggs, cottage cheese or some European style yogurt with nuts.

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Egg News from AEB

Incredible News from AEB - December 2010

AEB launched a new program on distributing 225,000 coupons via SmartSource.com

This fall, magazines highlighted the benefits of eating eggs, including their affordability, nutritional value and versatility.

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Break out of your breakfast rut

Shape - November Issue

Breakfast can be a dieter’s best friend. “It jump-starts your metabolism while keeping you from snacking mindlessly and overeating throughout the day,” says David Grotto, RD, author of 101 Optimal Life Foods. “Add nutrients and flavor to a plain two-egg omelet by folding in leftovers, like chicken, sautéed spinach or roasted squash.”

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Kashi Cereal vs The Incredible, Edible Egg: REALLY...

Blog: Balanced Bites - Real Food For Real People - October 27, 2010 -
By nutritionist/holistic lifestyle coach Diane Sanfilippo

I nearly fell over when I saw the latest Kashi commercial touting it's cereal as having as much protein as an egg. Oh man, they've sunk to a new low if they think that their cereal can hold a candle to a whole food from nature. I have to re-paint this nutritional picture for you in an appropriate manner before this nasty rumor about cereal being anywhere near as good for you as an egg perpetuates further.

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Vast Majority of Global Egg Production in Cage Housing

United Egg Producers (UEP) is the nation’s leading egg farming cooperative for U.S. egg farmers

The vast majority of commercial egg production around the world continues to be in traditional cage housing, according to the latest statistics reported by the International Egg Commission and released Tuesday by the United Egg Producers, America’s largest cooperative of egg farmers nationwide.

Approximately 85 percent of eggs worldwide are produced in traditional cages, according to the IEC report. Thirty of the 35 countries which the IEC surveyed had more than half of their eggs produced in modern cages, and 15 of the 35 countries produced more than 90 percent of their eggs in cages. Seven countries produce all of their eggs in cages, according to the report, including Mexico, China, Brazil, India, Turkey, United Arab Emirates and Iran.

According to United Egg Producers, these countries would be in an ideal position to profit by increasing their export of eggs to the United States if egg cage housing restrictions are enacted here, as some animal rights activist groups have proposed. The United States produces 95 percent of its eggs in modern cage housing, and only 5 percent in cage-free or other non-cage type systems.

Gene Gregory, president of United Egg Producers, said that despite pressure and bullying tactics by some animal rights groups, the overwhelming majority of American consumers continue to prefer regular eggs from modern cage housing systems rather than cage-free. "Americans vote every day with their wallets, and regular eggs from modern cage housing systems win every time by a landslide ratio of 95 percent."

View complete report in PDF format

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Egg handling 101: Everything you need to know about egg safety

This Mama Cooks! - September 1, 2010 - By Anne-Marie Nichols

Today’s guest post about egg and food safety is from Mary Lee Chin, MS, RD of Nutrition Edge Communications. I had the pleasure of meeting Mary at the American Egg Board’s Good Egg Project blogger event last March in Arizona. If you want to learn more about egg nutrition, you can watch my video of Mary’s talk at the Good Egg Project event.

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Breakfast is anything but child’s play

Colorado Springs Gazette - August 31, 2010 - By Teresa Farney

“For the back-to-school breakfast, I suggest an egg sandwich,” she said about a recipe she teaches clients who participate in the WIC program. “Because they can do an egg in the microwave in 40 seconds in a custard cup. Then put the egg on a whole-wheat English muffin and add a slice of cheese and they have the ubiquitous egg sandwich.”

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Sack-packing students are well-schooled in lunch

Great Falls Tribune - September 1, 2010 - By Sydne George

Stocking up on staples such as eggs, peanut butter, whole wheat bread, tuna fish, whole grain tortillas and fruits and vegetables provides parents with basics from which to build healthy lunches. Crist said having protein in the morning is essential for concentration. "Add some protein to your breakfast with a hard-boiled egg or some peanut butter on your toast," she said.

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Embrace the Egg, Not the Recall

By Julie Murphree, Arizona Farm Bureau - August 26, 2010

Since the nationwide egg recall, I’m more in love with the egg. Yes, I said more in love with eggs than ever before. I was thinking about this during my omelet breakfast recently.

Despite the recall and while enjoying my omelet I couldn’t help but think that we need to continue to take advantage of this nutrient dense food source. And it’s cheap!

Sharing words of appreciation for our nation’s food safety system, Mary Lee Chin, MS, RD, an independent consultant based in Denver has some great advice on a balanced diet that includes eggs. “How wonderful that we have a system in this country that is able to identify a problem and issue a recall; we can target the source and really work to help alleviate the trouble,” she says. “From my perspective as a registered dietician, I know that eggs are an excellent source of high-quality protein and other nutrients and especially important during these economic times since eggs are also a reasonably priced source of good nutrition.”

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As Egg Fears Mount, Farmers Launch Reassurance Campaign

By Rupal Parekh and Maureen Morrison - August 25, 2010

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) -- As the number of recalled eggs escalates to nearly half a billion, the egg-farmers trade organization is launching a campaign to tell consumers their eggs are not only still incredible -- they're also safely edible.

Today's American Egg Board ad assured consumers that the potentially affected eggs have been removed from store shelves.

The American Egg Board today took out full-page ads in major newspapers including The New York Times, Wall Street Journal and USA Today to try and tamper down rising fears around America's favorite breakfast food. The ads call attention to the fact that "the potentially affected eggs, which make up less than 1% of all U.S. eggs, have been removed from store shelves" and end with the reminder that "thoroughly cooked means thoroughly safe." Consumers are driven from the print ads to a website, eggsafety.org.

View complete article in PDF format

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Hickman Egg Farms See Increase in Business

MyFOXPhoenix.com - Posted on August 19, 2010

BUCKEYE - The egg recall in Iowa is actually helping egg farms here in Arizona. Hickman's Family Farms, the largest egg producer in the southwest, say they've been flooded with calls from people wanting to buy their eggs.

Grocery stores and restaurants from all over the country are searching for eggs -- and they're not boycotting Arizona.

"We've had calls from as far away as Reno Nevada, San Francisco, calling to find out if they can purchase some eggs because their egg supply was wiped out with this recall," says Clint Hickman, talking about the 380-million egg salmonella scare.

Egg brokers want to buy truckloads of his eggs. Hickman is even getting calls from egg brokers in Mexico.

"Everybody and their mother say they're boycotting Arizona but we've seen no effect on that," he says.

Unfortunately, Hickman says he can't fill every order -- a hen will only lay one egg a day. He says the demand is so high, prices of eggs could go up by 30 cents.

Hickman says they've never had a salmonella scare. They have purchased a UV machine that disinfects the outside of each egg. Hickman says reports are false that Safeway and Albertsons eggs are involved.

The best way to protect from salmonella is to fully cook your food.

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Cook your eggs and you don't have to worry

by Catherine Holland - azfamily.com - Posted on August 19, 2010

PHOENIX -- In the wake of a massive nationwide egg recall sparked by salmonella contamination, the director of the Arizona Department of Health Services says you don't have to worry as long as you cook your eggs all the way through.

Will Humble explains it all to Bruce Haffner, who actually has a hard-boiled egg for lunch.

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Eat Good. Do Good Every Day.

American Egg Board newsletter - July 2010

America’s egg farmers donate millions of eggs each year to food banks, but there is still a desperate need for more high-quality protein foods like eggs.

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Healthy breakfast frittata

True Health - July 15, 2010

Enjoy this healthy Frittata any time of day, courtesy of George Mateljan the author of “The World’s Healthiest Foods”

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Choline: How much do we need and why is it important?

AnnArbor.com - July 13, 2010 - By Melissa Gerharter MS, RD

The best sources of choline can be found in liver, eggs and wheat germ. Cauliflower, cabbage, peanuts, soybeans and grape juice are also good sources. My recommendation is to eat a balanced diet full of fruits and vegetables and you should be getting enough of all of your vitamins and minerals.

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How to make a Mexican omelet

The Arizona Republic - July 13, 2010 By Karen Fernau

What's an easy, healthful alternative for young people who eat high-sugar cereals for breakfast? Begin the day with a phytochemical-loaded Mexican omelet.

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CHOLINE: The “New” Essential Nutrient

Egg Nutrition Center - www.enc-online.org

Pregnancy and lactation are periods when maternal reserves of choline are depleted. At the same time, the availability of choline for normal development of the brain is critical.

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Research Vindicates Eggs

Egg Nutrition Center - www.enc-online.org

Dietary Cholesterol Has Little Affect On Plasma Cholesterol.

After 30 plus years of being maligned for its cholesterol content, now, thanks to an ever growing body of research studies, eggs are making a comeback. Even the American Heart Association allows healthy adults to enjoy 7 eggs per week.

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Eggs & Heart Health

Egg Nutrition Center - www.enc-online.org

Dietary cholesterol, once thought to play a primary role in determining plasma cholesterol levels, is now understood to have a negligible effect on blood lipids in most healthy people. On average, increasing one’s intake of dietary cholesterol by 100 mg/day results in a 2.3 mg/dl increase in total cholesterol, a 1.9 mg/dl increase in LDL-cholesterol, and a 0.4 mg/dl increase in HDL cholesterol. Because HDL cholesterol increases with dietary cholesterol intake, the LDL:HDL ratio remains virtually unchanged.

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Get Cracking with Eggs

Triathlete Magazine - August Issue

Eggs are one of the most convenient and versatile ingredients when it comes to making something quick and healthy. They can be scrambled, steamed, fried, poached, boiled, baked, paired with any number of ingredients and eaten at any time of day.

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Organic Eggs: More Expensive,
but No Healthier

By Jeffrey Kluger - Time Magazine, July 8

This year, like every year, has been a busy one for America's chickens. What the birds lack in smarts they make up for in work ethic, laying about 78 billion eggs annually (or 6.5 billion dozen), supplying a $7 billion industry. GM should be doing so well.

Like any other workers, hens turn out economy, premium and luxury products — known as factory, cage-free and organic eggs — and consumers pay accordingly. A recent survey conducted in one random city — Athens, Ga. — found factory eggs going for $1.69 per dozen, cage-free for $2.99 to $3.59, and organic for $3.99 to a whopping $5.38.

But it's worth it to pay more because you're getting a healthier product, right? Wrong. Most of the time, according to a just-released study by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the eggs are indistinguishable. When there is a difference, it's often the factory eggs that are safer…

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Time Magazine Isn't Chicken
about Debunking Organic Eggs
but No Healthier

By Kyle Gillis - Business & Media Institute, July 12

Breaking from liberal media ranks, newsmagazine reveals organic eggs no healthier than factory ones.

Perhaps the mainstream media counted their chickens before they hatched.

In a surprising admission, a July 8 Time magazine story revealed that organic eggs are no healthier than factory eggs. In the past, Time has championed organic foods and green lifestyles.

Still, the egg story included a survey of egg prices in a random city – Athens, Georgia – and predictably, the survey discovered factory eggs were only $1.69 a dozen whereas organic eggs ranged from $3.99 to $5.38 a dozen. Time noted a new study that found the organic eggs are not healthier, despite the higher price tag. ”But it's worth it to pay more because you're getting a healthier product, right? Wrong.,” Time said. ”Most of the time, according to a just-released study by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the eggs are indistinguishable. When there is a difference, it's often the factory eggs that are safer...”

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Fun Food Holidays™: May is National Egg Month

CDC Kitchen - May 3, 2010

Eggs are so rich in protein that they are actually used as a standard for measuring protein in other foods. And eggs are healthy again! The American Heart Association no longer recommends a limit on the number of egg yolks consumed in a week. Furthermore, the International Journal of Obesity has shown research that two eggs a day can help reduce belly fat.

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True or false: Eggs raise your cholesterol.

South Florida Sun-Sentinel - May 6, 2010

Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, scientists linked blood cholesterol with heart disease and gave eggs a bad rap.

But more recent studies have found that saturated and trans fats in a diet are more likely to raise heart disease risk, according to the American Heart Association.

An egg has only 1.6 grams of saturated fat, compared with about 3 grams in a cup of 2 percent milk. At 213 milligrams of cholesterol, one egg slips under the AHA's recommendation of no more than 300 milligrams a day.

Just watch the cholesterol levels in the other food you eat that day

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Egg & cheese waffle sandwich

Parade Magazine - May 5, 2010

From the American Egg Board culinary library, this quick & easy recipe transforms ordinary frozen waffles into a kid-pleasing breakfast treat.

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Eggs for Fibromyalgia & Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

About.com - May 5, 2010

Years ago, a lot of people cut down on eggs or eliminated them from their diet completely over cholesterol concerns. Now, however, most health experts agree that eating one egg a day won't hurt your cholesterol. Furthermore, eggs have a lot of nutrients that are good for everyone, as well as several that are frequently recommended for those of us with fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome.

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Feeding America

USA Today Online - May 3, 2010
300 naval crew members aboard the USS Porter

In this photo distributed by Feature Photo Service for the American Egg Board: America's egg farmers saluted our troops with a hot breakfast to nearly 300 naval crew members aboard the USS Porter in Fort Lauderdale, FL as part of the Good Egg Project on Saturday, May 1, 2010. America's egg farmers donated one dozen eggs in honor of each naval crew member aboard the battleship to Feeding America.

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Sweet Spot: How Sugary-Cereal Makers Target Kids

Time Magazine - Nov. 2, 2009 - By Bonnie Rochman

... cereal, along with other childhood favorites like Corn Pops and Cocoa Pebbles, is being labeled a public-health menace by Yale's Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity.

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Cooking for one: Eggs for dinner

The Whole Foods Market - March 25, 2010 - By Laye Joseph

With their good-quality protein as well as Riboflavin (B2), Vitamin A and iron, eggs are not only nutritious, but filling as well. (I choose the Omega-3 eggs for an added nutritional boost.) Since you can buy a half dozen at most stores and they stay fresh for about three weeks when properly refrigerated, eggs make a perfect solution for a meal for one.

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Changing the way I think about eggs: the Good Egg Project's Farm to Table Tour

This Mama Cooks - March 24, 2010

Our group was granted the rare opportunity to visit the Hickman Family Farms to see how eggs are produced. Before this trip I was a dedicated free range, organic egg consumer. I felt that happy chickens – ones that get to run around outside eating organic feed, bugs and whatever they could find in the fresh air and sunshine – made a better, tastier and healthier egg.

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The incredible, edible egg and a GIVEAWAY

BabyCenter.com - March 21, 2010 - By Kristina Sauerwein

Earlier this month, I had the opportunity to visit an egg farm in Arizona as part of the American Egg Board’s efforts to educate consumers about the high-nutrition, low-cost egg, the egg farming process and the Good Egg Project, which donates eggs to the hungry.

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There's a place in everyone's diet for eggs

The Times–Picayune (LA) - March 26, 2010 - By Molly Kimball

For such a nutritious food, eggs get a really bad rap. They made headlines back in the ’70s, when they were deemed off-limits for low-cholesterol diets. More than 30 years later, there is still a widespread belief that eggs are bad for us, in spite of the fact that numerous studies have shown no correlation between eggs and heart disease.

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A healthy breakfast can fuel your day

CBS 5 (CA) - March 24, 2010

Of the three daily meals, people seem to have the most trouble with eating breakfast. The excuses are: "I'm not hungry when I get up," or "I'm trying to lose weight," or "I don't have time." And yet, many nutrition experts maintain breakfast is the most important meal of the day. If you're in a hurry, have a hard-boiled egg ready and waiting.

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The incredible, edible donation

Yuma Sun (AZ) - March 24, 2010 - By Stephanie A. Wilken

An Arizona business wants to make sure Yuma-area families can participate in a holiday tradition with a donation of almost 1,900 dozen eggs to the Yuma Community Food Bank. Representatives with Hickman's Family Farms were on hand Wednesday morning to drop off the 22,464 eggs to the food bank.

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The awesome egg – perfect food in a perfect package

Chico Enterprise-Record (CA) - March 24, 2010 - By Nancy LIndahl

The good news about eggs is they contain the nutrient choline (mainly in the yolk, so ditch the egg white omelets) that has been found to reduce the risk of breast cancer. They contain lutein and zeaxanthin, two antioxidants that help ward off macular degeneration. Best of all, two eggs a day at 72 calories each are a more satisfying breakfast than carbs, and will help you lose weight according to Louisiana State University research.

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Ms. Cheap: Frugal food doesn't necessarily mean junk food

The Tennessean - March 20, 2010 - By Mary Hunt

Eggs. A dollar or a little more will get you a dozen eggs in most any Middle Tennessee supermarket (I have seen them for as little as 49 cents a dozen at Aldi), and you can do all kinds of things with eggs – scramble them, fry them or use them in egg salads, quiches and omelets.

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Be a Good Egg . . . and help fight hunger

Good Housekeeping - March 20, 2010 - By Catherine Lo

Eggs aren’t only versatile and tasty, they’re also packed with protein and 13 essential nutrients, all in one cute little package. Which means that they’re an important tool in the fight against hunger, something that the folks at the American Egg Board are addressing with their Good Egg Project. For every person who logs onto their site and takes the pledge to “Eat good. Do good every day.”

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Healthy family meals

Baltimore Jewish Times - February 2010

Fein says focusing on dairy meals is another way to keep the grocery bill down. “I serve eggs at least once a week. I think eggs are probably the cheapest, best source of protein around,” she says. “I will make the eggs into something substantial. I have a recipe for huevos rancheros. It’s a full meal. It has vegetables, protein, carbs, and you can cook it in advance and pop it in the oven to reheat.”

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Calling all Incredible people!

MomLogic - February 9, 2010

America's egg farmers are on the hunt for the next 'Incredible Person!' If you or your kid has a cool talent, upload a video to IncredibleEgg.org for a chance to appear in an 'incredible edible egg' commercial -- along with a year supply of eggs (moms love protein!) and a food bank of your choice will receive eggs.

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A healthy budget breakfast

Glam Spirit - February 5, 2010

Eggs: Many nutritionists call eggs a true Super Food. Packed with protein, fat, vitamins and minerals, the nutrients in eggs will satisfy you for hours! You’ll save money because a dozen eggs breaks down to just a few quarters a day, and you can save time by hard boiling a batch of eggs to keep in the fridge for on-the-go snacking.

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New research shows the importance of eggs and meat in a pregnant woman's diet for fetal brain development.

feedstuffsfoodlink.com - January 17, 2010 - By Rod Smith

GOOD nutrition is critical for all of one's life, and new research found that this begins in the womb, where fetal brain development is influenced by the diet of the mother to be, according to a report this month in the journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB).

Furthermore, choline, a nutrient that can be found in eggs and meat, plays a major role in fetal brain development, especially in regions of the brain associated with memory, the report says, suggesting that bacon and eggs should be part of a pregnant woman's diet.

The research was conducted by scientists at the University of North Carolina.

Dr. Steven Zeisel, the lead scientist in the work and a senior member of the FASEB Journal's editorial board, said the research indicated that choline controls the epigenetic switches that support brain development in the fetus and is, therefore, important in optimal brain development.

Zeisel and his team reached this conclusion in a feeding study of two groups of pregnant mice during the period of time when a fetus develops its hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for memory.

One group of mice was fed a diet that contained choline, and the other group was given no choline.

By capturing cells from the developing fetuses' brains and growing them in cell cultures, the scientists determined the expression of genes for two proteins that regulate neuronal cell creation and maturation. The two proteins were more prevalent in the mice that received choline, according to the study.

The emerging field of epigenetics "is making us rethink those things we consider healthful and unhealthful," and this research suggests that good prenatal nutrition "is vitally important" for all of a child's lifetime, noted Dr. Gerald Wessmann, FASEB Journal editor-in-chief.

More information on the work by Zeisel and his team is at www.fasebj.org/cgi/content/abstract/24/1/184.

The U.S. Agricultural Research Service's Nutrient Data Laboratory provides consumers with a means to estimate choline intake from more than 400 different foods and, based on expert findings, suggests that adequate choline intake is 425 mg per day for women and 550 mg for men. The leading choline sources are meat, eggs and nuts, according to the database.

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Egg-potato tortilla center of cheap, tasty meal

The Detroit News - January 15, 2010 - By Betty Rosbottom

Although Americans tend to serve eggs as breakfast fare, other countries elevate them to star status later in the day. The French are crazy about omelets for lunch and supper, the Italians serve their frittatas, and the Spanish their tortillas long after the early morning hours. Such dishes make an inexpensive and delicious main course for dinner.

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Breakfast crucial; protein, fruit best

Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette - January 13, 2010

Not only can breakfast help you stay lean, it gives you the energy you need to jump-start your day and get your brain working at its peak. Try a hardboiled egg, a few whole-grain crackers and a tangerine.

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Beyond scrambled eggs: Hatching a new appreciation

Columbia Daily Tribune - January 13, 2010 - By Jim and Trish Koetting

The incredible, edible egg. Yes, it's a marketing phrase, but it does have some credence. There might be no other single ingredient that can be found with so many culinary applications.

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Egg-cellent information

Examiner.com - January 10, 2010

America's egg farmers and the American Egg Board have joined together to create The Good Egg Project to educate the public about where eggs come from and encourage people to pledge to "Eat Good. Do Good Everyday."

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Leaving the roost

Altoona Mirror (PA) - January 10, 2010 - By Ashley Gurbal

"We eat a lot of poultry in the United States," Martin said. "Eggs are the cheapest form of protein, with the highest digestibility. They're about a nickel an egg. If you bought a nickel of beef or a nickel of fish, it'd be a lot smaller."

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Get the perfect body by eating the perfect food: Eggs

One 80 - December 28, 2009

A single egg contains only 70 calories and a bundle of protein, vitamin A, vitamin B12, choline, and lutein that are all important in weight loss, muscle development, fighting obesity, and preventing cancer.

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Food donations made

Feedstuffs.com - December 22, 2009

The American Egg Board (AEB) and Colorado Egg Producers Assn. recently teamed up to donate 100,000 eggs -- more than 8,000 doz. eggs -- to the Food Bank of the Rockies in Denver, Colo., according to an announcement. They also served a hot breakfast of eggs, meat and potatoes to the food bank's patrons, with "Omelet King" Howard Helmer on hand to demonstrate how to make omelets.

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Eat Right: Should you eat whole eggs?

Maximum Fitness - Jan/Feb Issue - By Neva Cochran, MS, RD, LD

Would you knowingly throw away 10 percent of your daily protein? Well, if you toss out the yolks and opt only for egg whites, that's what you're doing. The white supply only protein, riboflavin and selenium. Thirty years of research has hasn't linked eggs to developing heart disease.

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Make this your happiest, healthiest winter ever

Woman's World - December 21, 2009

Nix those yearnings by eating two eggs each morning: Scientists say the niacin in eggs satisfies the part of the brain responsible for cravings. They're also a great source of lean protein, so eggs fill you up for longer and stabilize your blood sugar.

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Keep track of your food

Vander Wal JS, et al. Egg breakfast enhances weight loss. Int J of Obesity 2008L 32(10): 1545-1551

Volunteer subjects reported that a high-protein breakfast of eggs and Canadian bacon can help you feel more satisfied and less hungry throughout the day than if you "saved" the protein for lunch or dinner... Another study published in the International Journal of Obesity showed that overweight adults who ate twoeggs for breakfast rather than a bagel were more able to lose weight.

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50 ways to cut 500 calories a day

MSN Health & Fitness - December 7, 2009 - By Shaun Chavis

Simple tricks to fill up (with less!). For breakfast, eat 2 boiled or poached eggs. (You'll feel fuller and eat about 416 fewer calories the rest of the day.) Before lunch and dinner, enjoy 1 cup low-cal soup. (You'll eat about 134 calories less at each meal.) And save a total of 684 calories for the day.

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5 healthy snacks that will fill you up

Health.com - November 12, 2009 - By Julie Upton, RD

At 75 calories and 6 grams of protein, a hard-boiled egg is a perfectly portion-controlled snack. It contains complete protein, which is highly absorbable and has all the amino acids humans need.

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Senior cares: Foods seniors shouldn't go without

Wicked Local Lexington - November 12, 2009 - By Jack Cross

In spite of getting a bad rap for a while, eggs are still a food not to be ignored. With only 75 calories per serving, eggs contain 13 essential vitamins and minerals, including vitamin D, important to absorbing calcium needed for bone strength. Lutein and zeaxanthin in egg yolks may reduce the risk of cataracts and help prevent macular degeneration.

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The healthy $1 menu: Black bean and egg burritos

The Nourishing Gourmet - November 10, 2009 - By Kim Harris

Black beans and scrambled eggs are gently flavored with cumin, garlic and onion. Packed into a tortilla, they make a great breakfast burrito (or serve at lunch or dinner! Cost Analysis: 1 1/2 cups of organic cooked black beans .35; 3 eggs, .99.

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Environmentally friendly

Jude Capper, Ph.D., assistant professor of dairy sciences at Washington State University

One dozen eggs, transported several hundred miles to a grocery store in a tractor-trailer that can carry 23,400 dozen eggs is a more fuel-efficient, eco-friendly option than a dozen eggs purchased at a farmers' market (4.5 times more fuel used) or local farm (17.2 times more fuel used).

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The perfect poached egg: How to poach an egg

One80 - November 19, 2009

Eggs are nature's perfect food, they are a compact and nutritious source of protein that are low in calories and fat. Eggs are a perfect source of protein for any meal or snack and are inexpensive and a great solution for anyone on a diet and on a budget.

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Olive Oil Fried Egg

The Jeffrey Saad "Cooking Without Borders" - November 17, 2009

Today I am making an olive oil fried egg. I love this recipe because it is quick, easy and incorporates three simple ingredients that you can have in the house at all times: onions or shallots, olive oil, paprika and of course the incredible egg.

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Promoting Satiety

Source: Vander Wal JS, et al. Egg breakfast enhances weight loss. Int J of Obesity 2008L 32(10): 1545-1551 - November 19, 2009

"A number of studies published over the past 10 years indicate that proteins are the most satiating of the calorie-containing nutrients (carbohydrates, fats, proteins)," says Mitch Kanter, executive director, Egg Nutrition Center, Park Ridge, IL. According to Kanter: "Recent studies with eggs have tended to corroborate the satiety-inducing benefits associated with protein. For example, in a study of overweight and obese women who consumed either an egg breakfast or an equal-calorie bagel-based breakfast, the women who consumed eggs reported greater satiety throughout the morning, and they consumed fewer calories at the lunch meal than the women who consumed the bagel breakfast."

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Get an egg-on-top dish, help the food bank

The Arizona Republic - By John Stanley - November 17, 2009

Clint Hickman challenged Valley chefs to create their own "Egg on Top" dishes. Every time a patron orders one of the special dishes, $1 goes to St. Mary's Food Bank Alliance. Hickman's will match the restaurants' contribution, dollar for dollar. And each patron who purchases one of the egg dishes will receive a coupon for a dozen free eggs.

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Recipes for before, after that big meal

San Francisco Chronicle - By Amanda Gold - November 15, 2009

Eggs. Packed with protein for a much-needed energy boost, they make sense eaten at 6 a.m. or noon.The accompanying recipe for Open-Faced Egg Sandwiches fits the bill on many levels. If you're busy chopping onions for stuffing, gravy or another side dish, slice an extra one to caramelize while you're prepping other ingredients.

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HUNGER

Greeley Tribune - November 20, 2009

Howard Helmer, left, a Guinness World Records holder since 1999 for the world's fastest omelet maker, shows Jean Haskovec of Firestone, who works for Eggland's Best Eggs, how to flip an omelet from the pan to the plate Thursday afternoon at the Weld Food Bank in Greeley.

Howard Helmer holds two Guinness World Records - one for making 427 omelets in 30 minutes and one for making a single omelet, from cracking the egg to placing the omelet on the plate, in 41 seconds.

Members of the Colorado Egg Producers, who supply the Weld Food Bank with 40,000 eggs a month, include Morning Fresh Farms of Platteville, Sparboe Farm of Hudson, Boulder Valley Farms of Roggan, Nest Fresh Eggs of Denver, Hillside Egg Farm of Niwot, Countryside Eggs of Fort Morgan and Colorado Eggs of Grand Junction.Howard Helmer can make an omelet faster than a hen can lay the egg.

Helmer, who's been with the American Egg Board in New York City for more than 40 years, holds the Guinness World Records title as the fastest omelet maker. He was at the Weld Food Bank on Thursday with representatives of the Colorado Egg Producers and gave his expert instruction on how an omelet should be made.

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Animal fats not linked to breast cancer risk

www.foodnavigator-usa.com - August 17, 2009

Eating fats from meat, eggs and dairy products does not increase the risk of breast cancer in women, according to new research findings published in the September 2009 issue of the peer-reviewed publication American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. For nine years, researchers evaluated women's consumption of meat, eggs and dairy products and tracked cancer rates to determine correlation.

In an editorial accompanying the article, Eleni Lenos from Stanford University Medical Center and Walter Willett from the Harvard School of Public Health note that many large cohort studies conducted worldwide with well over 1 million women show "no overall relation of meat or dairy products consumed in midlife or later to breast cancer risk."

While conceding that additional data on diet during childhood and early life is needed, Lenos and Willet also stated, "these data are sufficient to exclude any major effect of consuming these foods during midlife or later on risk of breast cancer."

In comments about the study, Shelley McGuire, spokeswoman for the American Society for Nutrition, said, "First, we all need to remember that there really are no such things as 'bad' foods." Second, according to McGuire, "Observational studies that show associations between diet and health need to be considered with a proverbial grain of salt. These studies clearly provide additional and strong evidence that consumption of meat and dairy products does not, by itself, increase breast cancer risk." (thanks to Julie Murphree, Ag & FB News)

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Don't chuck the yolks!

Food Chat - July 20, 2009

Whole eggs are also a good source of selenium, iodine, vitamin B12, B2, and some vitamin D - the sunshine vitamin many of us lack. What other hidden gems do eggs provide? Unfortunately, those who toss the yolks are missing out on some of the greatest egg attributes, not to mention wasting food and money.

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Tips for entertaining on a budget

The Dallas Morning News - July 22, 2009 - By Tina Danze

Go for brunch. Egg dishes are inexpensive, and you'll keep the cost even lower by serving coffee and juices as the main drinks.

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Deal Diva - Look at grocery bill: Is your food high-value?

Charlotte Observer (NC) - July 19, 2009 - By Tara McAlister

Eggs: High-quality protein at a very low price. I love having breakfast for dinner. Pair eggs with fresh fruit and whole wheat toast, or create an omelet or frittata with eggs and vegetables.

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Six foods that keep you full and satisfied

Examiner.com (CA) - July 19, 2009 - By Anurandha Dixit

Eggs: They're a great source of hunger-quelling protein (about 6 g per egg), plus a recent study found that women following a low-fat diet who ate 2 eggs for breakfast at least 5 days a week lost 65% more weight and averaged an 83% greater reduction in waist circumference.

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An egg-cellent recipe for babies who enjoy lumps and bumps!

Wholesome Baby Food Recipes Blog - May 13, 2009

We're sharing a "casserole" from our favorite egg recipes site, the American Egg Board. This is called the Good Morning Casserole. You can use all egg yolks (12 of them) if your baby has not yet started whole eggs.

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There's plenty of savings packed in each egg

Dollars & Sense (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel blog) - May 11, 2009 - By Theresa Lorbiecki

One of the best breaks for the supermarket shopper is the humble egg. A carton of 12 costing less than $2 means you're covered morning, noon and night. Eggs deliver big time in the protein, vitamins and minerals department.

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